Fisher Ghyll

Film and development details on My Ipernity
Near St. John’s in the Vale, Lake District, Cumbria, July 2013
Dictionary explanation for anyone not familiar with the word ‘Ghyll’
World English Dictionary
gill or ghyll 3  (ɡɪl)
n
1. a narrow stream; rivulet
2. a wooded ravine
3. ( capital when part of place name ) a deep natural hole in rock; pothole: Gaping Gill
[C11: from Old Norse gil  steep-sided valley]
ghyll or ghyll 3
n

4 Responses to “Fisher Ghyll”

    • John Pickles

      Thanks Marie.
      It was pretty gloomy here yesterday with frequent heavy showers. I had a hard time keeping the camera dry but I knew the streams and waterfalls would look good with plenty of water in them. Sometimes it’s worth going out whatever the weather!

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      Reply
  1. limr

    See, this post hits everything for me: beautiful picture and language (degrees in linguistics, years as a language teacher…) It’s interesting that ghyll and gully are similar in sound/form and meaning but seem to have different etymologies.

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    Reply
    • John Pickles

      ‘Ghyll’ is a word I’ve been familiar with for a long time but I’d never thought about it’s origin. It makes sense though – there are plenty of examples of local words with a Nordic origin in the Lake District.
      Thanks for commenting

      Like

      Reply

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